history1

Over 40 Years of BOSCH Mixers in America

In 1974, the BOSCH Mixer was introduced and exclusively distributed throughout North America. After more than 40 years and only three redesigns, the BOSCH Mixer is still a powerhouse, capable of both light- and heavy-duty kitchen tasks.

History

history1It all started with a movement to go back to natural, whole foods in the 1960s. As a result, grain mills started to gain popularity. In order to sell more grain mills, the original distributor sought to sell them in conjunction with a bread mixer. After researching the best bread mixer in the world, they knocked on the door of BOSCH in Germany. This venture ended in a handshake deal naming them as the exclusive distributor of BOSCH Mixers in America. The handshake deal solidified into more formal terms in 1990, which created L'Chef in 1991.

BOSCH mixers were originally sold via direct sales with representatives holding classes in their homes to demonstrate them. In 1986, after sales started to decline, BOSCH Mixers were introduced to retailers. This brought added convenience for buyers to purchase a mixer from a store shelf instead of watching a 2-hour demonstration. This caused sales to skyrocket. However, direct sales and hands-on education are still an integral part in selling mixers and mills today.

Today, sales in America total just under 70 percent of worldwide BOSCH Mixer sales. This success is contributed to redesigns and gaining awareness of different uses rather than just a bread maker. Grass-roots demonstrators and dedicated retailers contributed to the success and admiration surrounding these kitchen machines.

Evolution of a Mixer

evolution

The original BOSCH Mixer dates back to 1952. First introduced in Germany, it was geared towards German homemakers, then became popular throughout Europe. In 1972, it was redesigned with the first polycarbonate housing that is lighter and develops less heat in the motor. It also was given a transmission, allowing it to "gear down" for tougher mixing jobs. This mixer was new and innovative. It was the same mixer distributed in America in 1974.

Since then, the BOSCH Universal Plus Mixer has undergone only two other redesigns in its lifetime: one in 1986 and the other in 2007. These resulted in boosted transmission power and speed variability, creating the mixer we have today. This speaks to its quality engineering and durability.

In addition, all modern tune-ups and various attachments have developed from L'Chef in America. These attachments truly make this mixer a universal kitchen machine. For example, our number one selling attachment, the cookie paddles, allow you to mix American-style recipes to the correct consistency for best results. Once approved by BOSCH in Germany, these attachments are sold all over the world.

BOSCH Performance

Bosch Universal Plus Stand Mixer MotorWhat is truly unique about BOSCH Mixers is the powerful motor and belt-driven transmission. This transmission gives tremendous power, and coupled with the dough hook, gives the mixer its unique ability to properly knead bread for 100% gluten development.

The dough hook was originally created to mimic the motions of hand kneading. It simulates the folding, stretching, and tucking movements required for proper gluten development. Gluten is the protein found in grains that gives elasticity to breads, which is necessary for proper rising and final texture. However, traditional hand kneading requires two to three turns of kneading by hand in addition to rest periods for rising. This can take up to 5 hours, including baking time. The BOSCH Mixer creates 100% gluten development in 6-8 minutes of kneading, or about 75-90 minutes total, including baking time. This original quality engineering is why the dough hook has never changed.

BOSCH Mixers are truly a unique machine capable of performing many kitchen tasks and delivering quality products.

L'Chef is always an advocate for the homemaker. We look for the customer who is serious about cooking, because we distribute quality products built for that task.